Los Angeles Times

Tension continues on the uptick surrounding the controversial practice of immigrants attempting to cross the border. While one's political beliefs may hold them to a certain practice, their moral and "higher standard" of compassion toward humanity is rarely challenged. While there is no clear-cut design to helping those in need, one thing is for sure - compassion trumps law.

Our views on how immigrants attempt to cross the border have been skewed and developed by mass media coverage that sways in the extremes. But what if for once the media stepped back and said to the viewer, "You decide what is right"?

Challenge

Immigration has began to be stereotyped within recent media. Portrayals of trucks filled with immigrants being dumped off at the border is wildly inaccurate but has been deemed realistic. Because media has taken the humanity out of these stories, people forget to see those attempting to enter the U.S. as the humans that they are.

Audience

Level-headed citizens that are not alt-left or alt-right. They are in the pursuit of discovering personal truths applying those truths into their daily beliefs and practices. They live throughout the United States and rage from 20-55 in age. They are not activists, but are the silent majority. Because they are fence-sitters, they tend to keep their political views relatively sheltered.

Insight

"I struggle to draw a definitive line between my political and personal beliefs."

Strategy

Bring light to the difficulties and motives as to why people risk their life in order to find a better one North of the border.

Demonstrate the challenges that are correlated with helping someone in need or watching them suffer. Leave the audience contemplating what they would do when faced with the decision. 

See Creative Brief
Strategy: Quinn Frehner
Art Director: Cam Tribe
Copy: Enoch Lui
Producer: Connor Dean
DP: Spencer Goff
Director: Benji Allred